Oak Hill

Oak Hill

The City of Oak Hill is a hidden jewel just south of downtown Nashville. The City encompasses eight square miles with about 1,800 homes. Its 4,700 residents are drawn to the exclusive single-family zoning and low-density housing on large, tree-filled lots.

City Management

Incorporated in 1952 before the formation of Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County, Oak Hill exists as a satellite City within the Metropolitan family. City Hall is located at 5548 Franklin Pike Suite 102, Nashville TN 37220. The City's primary responsibility is community planning, land use, and zoning.

City Officials

The City has a manager/commission form of government, with an elected board of commissioners, which selects the mayor and vice mayor, and a planning commission and board of zoning appeals appointed by the mayor. See Officials.

Services

The City contracts and provides such services as street maintenance and paving, monthly chipper service, twice-weekly backdoor trash and recycling pickup, right-of-way maintenance, and other services at no cost to the residents of Oak Hill. Oak Hill also issues building permits and manages building codes inspections. Emergency services, including fire and police, are the responsibility of Metropolitan Nashville and Davidson County. See Services.

Location

The City of Oak Hill is generally bounded by Old Hickory Boulevard. on the south, Woodmont Boulevard on the north, and I-65 on the east. The western border includes General Bate Drive in the northwest, Granny White Pike in the midsection, and Bright Hour Farm on Old Hickory Boulevard in the southwest.

Amenities

The City of Oak Hill is completely residential with no commercial establishments. It is home to the Tennessee Governor's Residence, 15 churches, and a number of schools. Within its borders is Tennessee's largest state natural area, the 1,200-acre Radnor Lake.

History

James Robertson established a settlement he called Nashborough in 1779, and his friend John Donelson brought about 60 families to join him in 1780. John Overton came to the area in 1789 and named his horse-breeding farm in the Oak Hill area Travellers Rest. More

Information is believed to be accurate, but not guaranteed.
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